Pier Park, Panama City Beach
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Daily: 11AM-10PM

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Making History

In 2023, Simon/Pier Park and SkyWheel Panama City Beach partnered to gift this mural–the first privately-funded public art in the City of Panama City Beach–to the community.

Artist Kollet Hardeman included only native marine life in her design: black groupers, a bottlenose dolphin, a dwarf seahorse, a great white shark, lesser amberjacks, mahi-mahis, a Mexican four-eyed octopus, pompanos, queen angelfishes, red snappers, sergeant majors, leatherback sea turtles, sheepsheads, southern stingrays and yellowfin tunas.

Directory:


Fish Facts:

Leatherback Sea Turtle
Leatherback Sea Turtle

Leatherback sea turtle’s biology has remained unchanged for millions of years! They have existed in their current form since the dinosaur age.

Sergeant Majors
Sergeant Majors

These striped fish are nest builders. Adult males clear spaces on hard surfaces like rocks, shipwrecks, and pilings and guard the eggs after spawning.

Southern Stingray
Southern Stingray

While average adult size is much smaller, mature southern stingrays can grow to 5 feet wide. Like most whiptail stingrays, the southern stingray’s tail is often longer than its body’s width.

Red Snapper
Red Snapper

Red snappers grow at a moderate rate and may reach 40 inches long and 50 pounds in weight. They can have a long lifespan—up to 57 years based on Gulf of Mexico reports!

 

Lesser Amberjack
Lesser Amberjack

The lesser amberjack is known for its boomerang-shaped tale. The smallest of the amberjacks, these predators feed on small fish, squid, and crabs.

Sheepshead
Sheepshead

Sheepsheads have strong, human-looking teeth that help them breach hard shells. Favorite foods include plants, seaweed, and algae which they grind with their enamel-coated teeth.

 

Pompanos
Pompanos

Pompanos prefer the nearshore and turbid waters found along sandy beaches, oyster bars, and over seagrass beds. These bottom-feeders inhabit warm waters worldwide.

Great White Shark
Great White Shark

The largest of all predatory sharks, great white sharks have serrated, bladelike teeth that can reach over 6 inches in height. A female great white shark can birth up to 14 pups!

Bottlenose Dolphins
Bottlenose Dolphins

Bottlenose dolphins have a streamlined body. Propelled by powerful flukes, the marine mammal can dive deeply and swim swiftly, reaching speeds of up to 22 miles per hour!

 

Black Grouper
Black Grouper

Black groupers grow up to five feet long and can weigh up to 180 pounds. They begin life as females, but some change into males as they grow—usually between two and four feet in length or when they reach age 11 or older. They can live for up to 30 years!

Mahi-Mahi
Mahi-Mahi

Mahi-Mahis are a fast-growing species. They can grow up to 2.7 inches per week and can reach their adult size within about one year. They reproduce rapidly and are sometimes referred to as the rabbits of the sea.

Dwarf Seahorse
Dwarf Seahorse

Dwarf seahorses are only an inch tall and have a high, columnar coronet. Males give live birth to three to 16 fully-formed, quarter-inch-long young after a 10-day gestation period. Males carry two broods per month, and the mating season is February to October.

Yellowfin Tuna
Yellowfin Tuna

Yellowfin tunas are among the Gulf of Mexico’s fastest swimmers! Like some shark species, yellowfin tunas must continuously swim forward to keep oxygen-rich water flowing over their gills.

Queen Angelfish
Queen Angelfish

Queen angelfish were named for their “crowns”—a round, blackish-blue spot on the top of their heads. They can grow as large as 18 inches long and can weigh more than three pounds.

Mexican Four-Eyed Octopus
Mexican Four-Eyed Octopus

The Mexican four-eyed octopus appears redder when agitated. The main difference between the common octopus and the Mexican four-eyed octopus is a dark spot located beneath each of its eyes. The spots look like eyes and are called ocelli.